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Khismatullin, Damir Ph D

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    Background: bubble and drop dynamics and the dynamics of multiphase and multi-component systems (multiphase flow) including bubbly liquids, emulsions, suspensions, and polymer solutions. My Ph.D. thesis was completed under the guidance of and in the collaboration with Profs. Iskander Akhatov and Robert Nigmatulin, who are internationally-recognized leaders in multiphase flow and bubble dynamics. Research experience: interdisciplinary and collaborative. Since coming to the United States as a NSF-NATO Postdoctoral Fellow, I worked in the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at BU (2000-2001), the Department of Mathematics at Virginia Tech (2001-2003), and the Departments of Biomedical Engineering at Duke and BU (2003-2008). This allowed me to establish collaboration with research groups in several different fields ranging from Mathematics to Medicine. Primary current interests: cellular biomechanics, medical ultrasound, thrombus rheology, and application of multiphase flow to biological systems. My work with Dr. Truskey (Duke University) gave me a great understanding and experience in modeling of biological systems and biological experimentation in vitro. One of the results of the collaborative work with Dr. Truskey is development of the first realistic 3-D computational model of deformable cell adhesion. Medical ultrasound and thrombus rheology research comes from my postdoctoral work at BU at 2000-2001 (supervised by Dr. Ali Nadim) and collaboration with leading researchers in physical acoustics (Drs. Ronald Roy and R. Glynn Holt). The main objective of my research activities is to integrate computational modeling, in vitro and in vivo experiments to improve understanding of the behavior of biological systems under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Paper citation index: According to Scopus and ISI Web of Science, my papers have been cited 186 times (about 10.3 per paper), as of January 2010, which is 2.47 times higher than the five-year period citations-per-paper impact score of Physical Review E (4.19), a first-ranking journal among those publishing original contributions in the field of fluid dynamics.

Butler, Margaret Ph D

Clum, Gretchen Ph D

Zawacki, Corinne Ph D

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    I am interested in the ecological and evolutionary processes that generate and sustain biodiversity, and how an understanding of these processes can be applied toward the conservation of amphibians. My research explores both micro- and macro-evolutionary patterns of variation and spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The questions I ask address (1) the effects of landscape heterogeneity, geographic history, and climate change on patterns of genetic variation, (2) the tempo and mode by which pre- and post-mating isolation evolve among incipient species, (3) the contributions of selection and genetic drift to the evolution and maintenance of phenotypic variation, and (4) the role of environmental and phenotypic heterogeneity in shaping the outcomes of host-pathogen interactions. 

Shimshack, Jay Ph D, MS

Hebert, Thomas Ph D, MS

Wee, Beth Ph D, MS

Lay, J. Celeste Ph D

Christenson, Terry Ph D

Wilson, C Ph D, MS

Fadok, Jonathan PhD

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    Survival of an organism is contingent upon selection of appropriate behavioral responses in the face of rapidly changing environmental stimuli. This depends on learning about predictors of possible positive and negative outcomes, and on mounting an adaptive behavioral response. Understanding how activity in defined neuronal circuits (identified using molecular markers and anatomical connectivity) mediates appetitive (positive) and aversive (negative) learning, as well as how these circuitries are distinct or overlapping, is a central question in the Fadok laboratory. Using a multidisciplinary approach that combines advanced neuroanatomical tracing techniques, behavior, neurophysiological recordings, and methods to manipulate brain function, the Fadok lab is dissecting the neuronal circuitry of appetitive and aversive learning with a focus on interactions between brain areas and cell types. Ultimately, elucidating these mechanisms at the level of defined neurons and circuits is fundamental, not only for developing a basic understanding of memory processes in the brain, but also to inform a mechanistic approach to psychiatric conditions associated with dysfunctional appetitive or aversive circuits, including anxiety and mood disorders.